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Modris Svilans is an artist based in Riga, Latvia. He is in NYC as an apexart New York City Fellow from September 9 - October 9, 2014.
CURRENT NEW YORK CITY FELLOW
 


Damali Abrams is a NYC-based artist traveled to Seoul, South Korea, as an apexart International Fellow from July 1 - 30, 2014.
RECENT INTERNATIONAL FELLOW

Posts tagged with "Stephanie Powell"

If you search the word “exotic” in google images, what shows up are palm tree-lined beaches, Asian fruits, sport cars, weird looking cats and sexy women that look ready to give it up. I search the word “exotic” in google images every now and then, hoping a baguette or cheeseburger will pop up, but it’s still just the predictable. It’s still a one-way descriptive term.

 I just came from two very different village scenarios: the Floating Villages in the Tonle Sap Lake and the Palm Village Resort and Spa in Siem Reap, in that order. 

The Floating Villages are communities that live on the lake, and I stayed at the villages on the south end of the lake not the touristy area further north. If you are a foreigner staying at these villages you are probably with an NGO developer, like I was. There would be nowhere to stay otherwise. We stayed in the schools.

 The latter village was a resort, or “nature’s oasis” as the sign said.  I didn’t take any pictures of the resort, but it’s like any nice resort: cool bungalow, amazing spa treatments, pool surrounded with palm trees. Just like the images google finds. I did take hundreds of pictures at the Floating Villages because that was what I agreed to do for the NGOs. And I’m glad I did and I sincerely hope their project is successful.

 I decided to not post any pictures of the Floating Villages, although it was the most profound experience of my trip so far.  They would look too exotic which is inaccurate. That’s one of the problems with photography- it removes the context.

 The last night there, our floating house/school drifted around the lake in the dark. All the homes were drifting, running into each other and the tall grass. We were spinning to the point where we had a hard time orienting ourselves.  It was frightening and incredible at the same time. And unphotographable. That night when a rat gnawing on a baseboard kept waking me up, I fantasized about how as soon as I got to a hotel and showered in a major city, I was going to get a cheeseburger. And my exotic cheeseburger came true, with a little piece of pineapple. 

Phnom Penh has been challenging to wrap my head around and I think the major intersections, which I deal with almost daily, illustrate it best for me. An underlying structure is present, but cars, tuk tuks, motos, bicycles, and pedestrians all cross at the same time in whichever direction to reach their destination. What appears chaotic somehow manages to flow like a continual, seamless set transition. And although it looks and sometimes feels a little dangerous, the moto is the way to go. 

Phnom Penh has been challenging to wrap my head around and I think the major intersections, which I deal with almost daily, illustrate it best for me. An underlying structure is present, but cars, tuk tuks, motos, bicycles, and pedestrians all cross at the same time in whichever direction to reach their destination. What appears chaotic somehow manages to flow like a continual, seamless set transition. And although it looks and sometimes feels a little dangerous, the moto is the way to go. 

Stephanie Powell

Stephanie Powell (b. 1972) was born in Yokusoka, Japan, and raised in Portland, Oregon. Stephanie received her B.F.A. from the University of Oregon in Studio Arts and her M.F.A. from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in Photography. Before studying art, her initial career interest was in journalism, which has consistently challenged her to think critically about the storytelling component of her work. Stephanie is currently living in Brooklyn, NY and is a Visiting Professor at Pratt Institute and Photography Technician at Parsons School of Design. Stephanie has received grants and fellowships from the Jerome Foundation, Marion Perry Foundation for the Arts, and the Illinois Arts Council. She has exhibited nationally and internationally as well as photographed for various Fortune 500 companies. Her current body of work, I Can See It In Your Eyes, deals with divided cultural identities and her other interests include New Age philosophies, mysticism and other Orientalist derivatives.


Stephanie participated in apexart’s Outbound Residency in Phnom Penh from June 29 - July 31, 2012. She was recommended by Noah Naime, an arts administrator in New York City. See her Resident Page for more information.